haiti: farm to mug coffee

Much of the food in Haiti is farm to table. We see goats at the market on Tuesday morning, and goat shows up at dinner that night. Almost all of the food is fresh and grown near by and with limited refrigeration, some not having any at all, it is completely necessary. Everything tastes better when fresh and the coffee in Haiti is no exception. It is dark, strong and thick with no bitterness. And the days they serve it with hot milk (sweetened condensed milk watered down)? Amazing.

This year, we picked up some fresh coffee from the market (twigs, dirt and all) and the women at the rectory dried, roasted and ground the beans for us. I wish you could see how finely ground this coffee is – finer than anything I have ever seen! And all done by hand. No fancy coffee grinders here – just a heavy hand and lots of love.

Beans by the scoop

Outside drying

Freshly ground coffee beans – as fragrant as you can imagine

2 days and 2,196 miles later I’ve got fresh Haitian coffee – at home. I’m just missing one thing:


faces of haiti

I had an incredible week in Haiti. We saw close to 800 patients, gave out almost 600 pairs of glasses and prepped patients for surgery this winter. But what really makes me fall in love with Haiti isn’t the number of patients we can help, or the warm, sunny weather – it’s the people. The people of Haiti have more hope, love, resilience and appreciation than I’ve never seen. And they are the reason I’ll keep going back.

They say pictures speak a thousand words, so I’ll let these pictures speak for themselves.