blueberry bliss smoothie

Blueberry Bliss Smoothie | A Nutritionist Eats

Sometimes I just want a non-green smoothie.

Can you relate?

I drink a green “juice” or smoothie on an almost-daily basis so when I order an all-fruit smoothie? It feels like a treat! (You can roll your eyes at that statement, I get it. And I totally deserve it.)

Blueberry Bliss Smoothie | A Nutritionist Eats

This particular smoothie is one from our neighborhood earthbar, which is, in my brother’s* words, “that yuppy, wannabe-hippy smoothie place.” Wannabe-hippy in the sense that it’s not that hippy. It’s more Range Rover than Prius; more spinning than yoga; and more $10 green juice than kale-from-the-garden. Either way, I love knowing that concoctions to cure everything from a cold to a hangover are a mere three blocks away.

*It’s worth noting that my country-living brother and his firefighter roommates just made frozen green cubes with kale, spinach and broccoli to add to their morning smoothies. Clearly he’s a little more yuppy/hippy than he’d like to let on.

Blueberry Bliss Smoothie | A Nutritionist Eats

No matter how you feel about earthbar, no one can deny that they make amazing juices and smoothies. I typically order a green juice or their detox smoothie which is a great combination of banana, pineapple, raw kale and hemp milk (see, always with the green drinks). Then I ordered the blueberry bliss and was blown away. (One time I also ordered an açaí bowl - amazing!)

The blueberry bliss smoothie is creamy, sweet and delicious. Antioxidant-rich blueberries are blended together with healthy-fat almond butter, protein powder (obviously full of protein) and a banana that adds not only sweetness but also potassium and iron.

Blueberry Bliss Smoothie | A Nutritionist Eats

So even though there isn’t a green in sight, this smoothie is packed with good-for-you ingredients. Though I don’t have kids of my own, I’m pretty sure this is a smoothie that even the little ones would enjoy – let me know if your kids (or you, I also care about you!) try it out!

nutrition facts: 278 calories, 13 grams of fat, 29 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams fiber, 16 grams sugar, 17 grams protein

Blueberry Bliss Smoothie

by Emily Dingmann

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Keywords: blender beverage breakfast snack gluten-free high protein vegetarian

Ingredients (2 servings)

  • 1 cup frozen blueberries
  • 1 frozen banana (or fresh)
  • 1 serving vanilla protein powder (about 28 grams)
  • 2 Tbsp almond butter
  • 2 cups milk

Instructions

Blend all ingredients until smooth.

Add more milk as needed.

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daily eats: 6.4.14

No food theme yesterday, but plenty of “little luxuries” throughout the day. I guess it doesn’t take much! (?) I had the day off of work yesterday (for Shavuot) and while I wasn’t doing anything exciting, it was wonderful to have a day at home to catch up on things.

beverages: coffee + 1/2 & 1/2 out of my favorite mug.

Daily Eats | A Nutritionist Eats

breakfast: 1 cup 2% greek yogurt + 1/2 cup granola. Not packing all of my meals for the day is a luxury in itself.

Daily Eats | A Nutritionist Eats

workout: 30 minutes of jillian michael’s yoga meltdown (<<affiliate) through live streaming on amazon prime. We started doing yoga at lunch on Wednesdays at work, so I stuck with that theme. With the exception of the sun salutations, I’d say this is more yoga-inspired, than typical yoga, but it was a great workout nevertheless.

lunch: 4 oz tuna + 1 Tbsp mayonnaise + celery + onion + 1 slice of bread + 1 oz shredded cheese with carrots + celery + pickles. This is my standard “lunch at home” meal and it’s one of my favorites. Simple and tasty.

Daily Eats | A Nutritionist Eats

snack: Definitely my favorite part of the day, mainly because it felt like such a treat! I had a glass of wine + turkey slices + sartori bellavitano cheese while reading. I’ve been focusing on books lately so I was really behind in my LA Times (just the food/home section) + magazines. I took some time to read both books and magazines. It was great…obviously something I need to do more of!

Daily Eats | A Nutritionist Eats

dinner: It’s another Blue Apron week, which is always super exciting. The menu this week included chicken thighs (last night!), beet pasta and tonight’s Maple & Ginger Glazed Salmon with Watercress, Orange & Parsnip Salad. This meal was OUTSTANDING! The salad, the glaze…OMG. (Someone was pretty much licking the pan, but I’m not going to name any names.) We’re still loving Blue Apron, try it out!

Daily Eats | A Nutritionist Eats

dessert: a small handful of chocolate-covered almonds

approximate nutrition stats1,957 calories, 103 grams fat (51%), 111 grams carbohydrates (25%), 16 grams fiber, 55 grams sugar, 109 grams protein (24%)

thoughts: pretty good! A lot of dairy, but that’s typical. :)

 

 

classic açaí bowl

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

If you have no idea what an açaí bowl is…know that you are not alone.

I probably wouldn’t know either except that I worked in the natural food industry for five years (meaning you see everything out there!)…and now I live in Southern California, where Açaí Bowls are available at every juice bar. And said juice bars are on every corner. If you live in Southern California and you don’t know what an açaí bowl is, then you might be alone. (Not really though because plenty of people in my office didn’t know what it was when I was eating it.)

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

We can start at the beginning.

What is Açaí?

Açaí is a superfood berry from the Amazon and açaí bowls are essentially an açaí smoothie topped with fresh fruit and some granola. Traditionally, the bowls are simple with sliced banana, granola and some guaraná syrup for some sweetness.

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

 

Açaí has very little naturally occurring sugar – each serving of 100 grams of puréed açaí contains 0-2 grams of sugar. For comparison, 100 grams of bananas contain about 12 grams of sugar.

 

 

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

Health Benefits of Açaí:

When açaí came onto the health food scene years ago, it was touted as a superfood. The term superfood doesn’t actually have a legal definition and is used more for marketing, but in my opinion ‘superfood’ means that a food has high levels of vitamins, nutrients, antioxidants, healthy fats, etc. (Old School Superfoods you have at home!)

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

 

Açaí is rich in antioxidants, fiber and healthy fats. Pretty impressive for a little berry, so I definitely consider it a superfood.

 

 

 

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

How to Make an Açaí Bowl:

While the possibilities are endless, I wanted to stick with the classics. (With that said, I can’t wait to try some of the fun additions featured in this great graphic from Sambazon: Anatomy of an Açaí Bowl)

Açaí bowls are really easy to make, they just require a trip to the natural food store to pick up some puréed açaí (found in the freezer) and a blender! The toppings are up to you. Since it is naturally really low in sugars, you might need to add a little honey or agave, or maybe the toppings will add enough. You can always try it without and then drizzle with honey if you need it.

nutrition facts*: 337 calories, 11 grams of fat, 6 grams protein, 57 grams carbohydrates, 9 grams fiber (*calculated using unsweetened almond milk)

Classic Açaí Bowl

by Emily Dingmann

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Keywords: blender breakfast beverage gluten-free high fiber vegan vegetarian spring summer

Ingredients (2 servings)

    Açaí Bowl

    • 7 oz frozen açaí
    • 1 cup milk of choice
    • 1 banana
    • 1 Tbsp honey (optional)

    Toppings

    • sliced banana
    • berries
    • granola

    Instructions

    Blend together açaí, milk, banana and honey.

    Pour into bowls and top with desired toppings.

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    whole-grain oat muffins

    (We just returned from Thailand and I can’t wait to tell you more about it – it was absolutely amazing!)

    Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

    Ok, I’m usually an anti-muffin person. Why? Because most of the time they run a fine line. They’re either essentially a cupcake or they’re so healthy that they don’t resemble anything close to an actual muffin. So if I’m going to eat a cupcake, I’m going to eat a cupcake – with lots of frosting. And if I’m going to eat a healthy breakfast, I’m going to…you get the point.

    But these muffins. Oh my. I don’t do a ton of baking but when the LA Times featured Clementine’s whole grain muffin with plump dried cherries, I knew it was a muffin I needed to try. Clementine is a bakery/cafe a few blocks from my office and I’m there a few times a month. Rarely do I get any of their baked goods though (even though their blondie is amazing), I usually stick with their deli salads and cold-brew coffee. (Other copycat Clementine recipes: lentil, beet & goat cheese salad and fall chicken salad)

    Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

    So here I had this recipe for a muffin that I figured had to be good, but I had never tried it. Research time! I picked up the muffin one afternoon and actually thought I would save it for breakfast the next morning. Um, nice idea in theory, but totally not realistic. After I finished my lunch, I dug into the muffin (a small portion!).

    It was so good and wholesome!

    Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

    These muffins are dense, and pretty short but I promise you that they taste more like the ‘cupcake muffins’ than the ‘healthy muffins.’ That’s all to say, they are delicious! I (again, lacking any sort of patience) dug into them right out of the oven was honestly a little surprised by how good they tasted. Richie (and my coworkers!) agreed.

    As you can see, they are packed full of oats, almond and flax meal and chia seeds. I love that the streusel topping gives it the ‘cupcake muffin’ feel without the typical white flour and sugar requirements of a ‘cupcake muffin.’ There are a few things that I think are worth discussing: 1) I decided to make the serving size two muffins. I felt it was a more realistic serving size. 2) These are calorie-dense. They are full of good-for-you ingredients that aren’t low in calories. Most of the time, I focus on ingredients rather than calories and this is a prime example.

    Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

    Nutritionally, these muffins are pretty impressive. They are 100% whole-grain, gluten-free and have an impressive 10 grams of protein and 9 grams of fiber per serving. Yes, there is real sugar in these muffins (remember I wanted them to taste like a cupcake muffin?) and normally I’m the type of person who is anti-ANTI-sugar, but for comparisons sake, the 17 grams of sugar are similar to what you would find in a strawberry greek yogurt.

    nutrition facts (for two muffins): 405 calories, 25 grams of fat, 10 grams protein, 39 grams carbohydrates, 9 grams fiber

    Whole-Grain Oat Muffins

    by

    Cook Time: 25 minutes

    Keywords: bake bread breakfast high fiber high protein vegetarian

     

    Ingredients (24 muffins (12 servings))

      For the Streusel Topping

      • 1/4 cup brown sugar
      • 1/4 cup soft butter
      • 3/4 cup old-fashioned oats

      For the Muffins

      • 2 1/2 cups old-fashioned oats
      • 2 1/2 cups low-fat buttermilk
      • 1/3 cup coconut oil (liquid)
      • 2 eggs
      • 1 Tbsp vanilla extract
      • 1 cup almond meal
      • 1 cup flax meal
      • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
      • 1/4 cup chia seeds
      • 1/2 cup brown sugar
      • 1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp baking powder
      • 1 tsp baking soda
      • 1 tsp salt

      Instructions

      For the Streusel Topping

      In a small bowl, stir together sugar and butter until smooth.

      Add oats and mix until combined.

      Spread onto a rimmed baking sheet and place in freezer until hardened, about 10 minutes.

      For the Muffins

      Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees.

      In a medium bowl, combine oats and buttermilk and set aside.

      Beat together the oil, eggs and vanilla in a stand mixer with paddle or large bowl with a hand mixer.

      Whisk together the dry ingredients: almond meal, flax meal, sliced almonds, chia seeds, sugar, baking powder and soda.

      Add oat and buttermilk mixture to egg mixture and with the mixer running, slowly add in dry ingredients, 1 cup at a time.

      Spoon the batter into lined muffin tins, filling them about 2/3 of the way and sprinkling with streusel topping.

      Bake the muffins for 12 minutes, than rotate pan. Bake another 12- 14 minutes until golden brown.

      Cool slightly before removing them from pan.

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