apple cinnamon oatmeal

Apple Cinnamon was always my favorite flavor growing up. Those two packets kept me warm enough to play in the snow and gave me a good start to the day so that I could excel in school. (I think my parents would especially agree with the excel part)

After a disappointing bowl from Caribou – I didn’t realize they squirted some sort of cinnamon syrup into the oatmeal – I came to the realization that an apple cinnamon home made version would probably be amazing. An earth-shattering flavor combonation? Not by any means, just a down-to-earth, warming bowl of oatmeal. Just what I need to get me through those Minnesota winters. And excelling at work never hurts either. ;)

Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal - 2 servings

  • 1 cup oatmeal
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 2 small apples, peeled and chopped
  • 1 Tbsp butter or butter alternative (I used earth balance)
  • 1-2 Tbsp maple syrup sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla

Prepare oatmeal as directed with water and almond milk mix. (I think the almond milk makes it extra creamy)

Add apples, sugar, cinnamon and vanilla to small saucepan.

Cook over medium heat for about 4-5 minutes.

Divide oatmeal in two bowls and top with apple mixture.


haiti: day of meals

I showed you some of the customary Haitian food last year, but I wanted to show you what a typical day of food looks like. Now this is more than what most Haitians eat on a daily basis, but still much less than most Americans. They feed us very, very well and the food is amazing, I absolutely love it! They’ve even got red wine!

Before my first trip, I asked my Mom how I would possibly be able to eat, when there are hungry people so close.  She responded with a wise and realistic answer: we are there to work in the clinic, and we aren’t going to do any good if we can’t perform at our best. This makes sense, but is still something I think of often while I’m there.

The portions are moderate and going back for seconds doesn’t typically seem right. Our leftovers are someone else’s meal, so I always really ask myself if I really need more food. I will admit to having seconds of popcorn though. A few times. :) As you can see, the meals are comprised mainly of starches, with some meat and vegetables sprinkled in. We also always bring a few loaves of bread and mamba (peanut butter) to eat throughout the week as well, which can help supplement small meals.

A number of times throughout the trip, I thought about how Haiti is not the place to be a picky eater, a “certain kind” of eater, counting carbs, etc. I’m so glad that I can eat white pasta and peanut butter with added sugar and some hydrogenated oils without going crazy. I know I don’t eat that way all the time, or at home, but when I’m in Haiti, I’ll eat just about anything.

Breakfast: spaghetti with deli ham

Lunch: soup with carrots, potato, green beans and a side of yucca root

Dinner: rigatoni with peas and bits of ham (leftover from breakfast), rice & beans with onion sauce, yams and a carrot, squash and beef (goat?) dish that was delicious. With a side of popcorn. Any cuisine that serves popcorn as part of the meal is one that I’ll enjoy ;)

You didn’t think I’d do a post without a cute kid picture, did you? I just can’t help myself!

haiti: farm to mug coffee

Much of the food in Haiti is farm to table. We see goats at the market on Tuesday morning, and goat shows up at dinner that night. Almost all of the food is fresh and grown near by and with limited refrigeration, some not having any at all, it is completely necessary. Everything tastes better when fresh and the coffee in Haiti is no exception. It is dark, strong and thick with no bitterness. And the days they serve it with hot milk (sweetened condensed milk watered down)? Amazing.

This year, we picked up some fresh coffee from the market (twigs, dirt and all) and the women at the rectory dried, roasted and ground the beans for us. I wish you could see how finely ground this coffee is – finer than anything I have ever seen! And all done by hand. No fancy coffee grinders here – just a heavy hand and lots of love.

Beans by the scoop

Outside drying

Freshly ground coffee beans – as fragrant as you can imagine

2 days and 2,196 miles later I’ve got fresh Haitian coffee – at home. I’m just missing one thing:


guest post: juicing

I met Emily through my wonderful sister-in-law Mary Beth . Emily and I have a shared interest in (obsession with?) nutrition and cooking, and when she asked me to write a guest post for A Nutritionist Eats, I was incredibly flattered. Thanks for the opportunity, Emily!

What can I say—Emily likes her wine, I like my beer (and my juice)

My interest in nutrition slowly evolved after years of dealing with Crohn’s disease. Prescription medications have a place in controlling Crohn’s and keeping it in remission, but I knew there had to be a way I could help myself from the inside. The disease affects the digestive system, so why not try to heal it through food?

Doctors recommended that I watch my fiber intake, which meant restricting fruits and vegetables. It’s tricky to limit fiber and still get all the necessary nutrients. How can a processed diet of Sprite, chicken ramen, goldfish crackers, and Jell-O help your body heal?

Enter juicing. With just 15 minutes and a pile of produce, you can get several servings of fruits and vegetables in just one sitting. There are myriad benefits to juicing. The concentrated dose of antioxidants you receive helps detoxify your body, cleanse your blood, and boost your immune system, while your stores of vitamins, minerals, and enzymes are replenished. Nutrients are easily and efficiently assimilated thanks to juice’s stripped-down state. You can add variety to your diet by incorporating many different fruits and vegetables, and juice is hydrating and energizing.

A quick search online will reveal recipes for any ailment, from anemia and acne to high blood pressure and the common cold. Juicing is also a great way to find balance again after traveling or a particularly rough night of drinking. (I know we’re talking health here, but I can’t wait to juice fresh tomatoes and herbs next summer for Bloody Marys!) I find that green juices in particular help curb my incessant craving for sweets. But the fact that freshly squeezed juice simply tastes so damn good is what will make juicing part of your food routine.

You don’t have to spend much on a juicer to get started. The model I purchased is affordable and easy to clean, two sticking points for many people when it comes to home juicing.

Sometimes I juice first thing in the morning and sip on it as I’m getting ready; lately I’ve found that having juice for dinner with a handful of almonds is a perfect weeknight dinner when I’m not too hungry.

It’s fun to experiment with different combinations, especially as my cravings and available fruits and vegetables change with the seasons. I would have to say, though, that nothing beats a glass of plain grapefruit juice on a crisp January morning. The vibrant pink color alone makes me swoon, and with just one taste, you’ll wonder how you ever ate the fruit with extra sugar sprinkled on top.

Here’s a recipe for one of my favorite combinations. Energizing iron, anti-inflammatory bromelain, bone-building vitamin K, and immune-strengthening vitamins A and C—you’d be hard pressed to find a better way to start your day. And oh! the flavor…do you remember the old Hi-C flavor Ecto Cooler? Well, this is it, only without the added sugar. Welcome to your new breakfast.


Adult Ecto Cooler

  • 1 granny smith apple
  • 3 generous handfuls of baby spinach
  • 1/3 bunch of parsley
  • ¼ pineapple
  • 2 celery stalks
  • ½ cucumber

 

Rinse all vegetables and cut as needed to fit into your juicer. Juice away, give it a stir, and enjoy!

Thank you Molly for making us all drool this morning, now I REALLY want a juicer! Looking forward to reading your blog soon!