sautéed banana oatmeal

Sautéed Banana Oatmeal | anutritionisteats.com

The heat wave finally broke in LA, and now that we can pretend like it’s fall along with everyone else, I’ve got oatmeal on the brain! I love making oatmeal from scratch (as opposed to using the flavored, instant versions – though I use them from time to time!) and loading it with extra flavor, a little sweetness and some protein and/or fat to keep me satisfied until lunchtime.

Sautéed Banana Oatmeal | anutritionisteats.com

And I can say without a doubt that this sautéed banana oatmeal is going to be a staple this fall. It’s sweet, it’s creamy and it tastes quite decadent. It’s the best of both worlds. It’s enjoyable enough for a weekend breakfast, but it’s also healthy enough for a weekday breakfast! (I like to keep breakfasts and lunches pretty healthy during the week but the weekends are another story.)

Sautéed Banana Oatmeal | anutritionisteats.com

Sautéing the bananas, as opposed to just topping cooked oatmeal with raw bananas takes this breakfast from “Ugh, it’s Monday” to “Mmm, it’s Sunday morning and I have the whole day to myself!” It’s ridiculously easy too.

Sautéed Banana Oatmeal | anutritionisteats.com

How easy?

  1. Slice bananas.
  2. Heat coconut oil in nonstick pan and add bananas.
  3. Sprinkle with brown sugar.
  4. Serve over hot oatmeal with hot milk.

And that’s it.

Sautéed Banana Oatmeal | anutritionisteats.com

You’ll be “Mmm-ing” and “Yumm-ing” no matter how early you had to wake up!

Sautéed Banana Oatmeal
Author: Emily Dingmann
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 2 servings
Ingredients
  • 2 servings oatmeal, prepared as directed
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 medium sized bananas, sliced
  • 2-3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 cup milk for serving
Instructions
  1. Heat coconut oil in medium sized pan.
  2. Add bananas to pan and cook for about a minute, stirring briefly.
  3. Sprinkle brown sugar over bananas, cook for one minute and stir so that mixture coats all bananas.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Divide bananas over oats and serve with warm milk.
Calories: 496 Fat: 20 grams Carbohydrates: 72 grams Sugar: 33 grams Fiber: 7 grams Protein: 10 grams

 

 

whole-grain oat muffins

(We just returned from Thailand and I can’t wait to tell you more about it – it was absolutely amazing!)

Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

Ok, I’m usually an anti-muffin person. Why? Because most of the time they run a fine line. They’re either essentially a cupcake or they’re so healthy that they don’t resemble anything close to an actual muffin. So if I’m going to eat a cupcake, I’m going to eat a cupcake – with lots of frosting. And if I’m going to eat a healthy breakfast, I’m going to…you get the point.

But these muffins. Oh my. I don’t do a ton of baking but when the LA Times featured Clementine’s whole grain muffin with plump dried cherries, I knew it was a muffin I needed to try. Clementine is a bakery/cafe a few blocks from my office and I’m there a few times a month. Rarely do I get any of their baked goods though (even though their blondie is amazing), I usually stick with their deli salads and cold-brew coffee. (Other copycat Clementine recipes: lentil, beet & goat cheese salad and fall chicken salad)

Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

So here I had this recipe for a muffin that I figured had to be good, but I had never tried it. Research time! I picked up the muffin one afternoon and actually thought I would save it for breakfast the next morning. Um, nice idea in theory, but totally not realistic. After I finished my lunch, I dug into the muffin (a small portion!).

It was so good and wholesome!

Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

These muffins are dense, and pretty short but I promise you that they taste more like the ‘cupcake muffins’ than the ‘healthy muffins.’ That’s all to say, they are delicious! I (again, lacking any sort of patience) dug into them right out of the oven was honestly a little surprised by how good they tasted. Richie (and my coworkers!) agreed.

As you can see, they are packed full of oats, almond and flax meal and chia seeds. I love that the streusel topping gives it the ‘cupcake muffin’ feel without the typical white flour and sugar requirements of a ‘cupcake muffin.’ There are a few things that I think are worth discussing: 1) I decided to make the serving size two muffins. I felt it was a more realistic serving size. 2) These are calorie-dense. They are full of good-for-you ingredients that aren’t low in calories. Most of the time, I focus on ingredients rather than calories and this is a prime example.

Whole-Grain Oat Muffins | A Nutritionist Eats

Nutritionally, these muffins are pretty impressive. They are 100% whole-grain, gluten-free and have an impressive 10 grams of protein and 9 grams of fiber per serving. Yes, there is real sugar in these muffins (remember I wanted them to taste like a cupcake muffin?) and normally I’m the type of person who is anti-ANTI-sugar, but for comparisons sake, the 17 grams of sugar are similar to what you would find in a strawberry greek yogurt.

nutrition facts (for two muffins): 405 calories, 25 grams of fat, 10 grams protein, 39 grams carbohydrates, 9 grams fiber

Whole-Grain Oat Muffins

by

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Keywords: bake bread breakfast high fiber high protein vegetarian

 

Ingredients (24 muffins (12 servings))

    For the Streusel Topping

    • 1/4 cup brown sugar
    • 1/4 cup soft butter
    • 3/4 cup old-fashioned oats

    For the Muffins

    • 2 1/2 cups old-fashioned oats
    • 2 1/2 cups low-fat buttermilk
    • 1/3 cup coconut oil (liquid)
    • 2 eggs
    • 1 Tbsp vanilla extract
    • 1 cup almond meal
    • 1 cup flax meal
    • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
    • 1/4 cup chia seeds
    • 1/2 cup brown sugar
    • 1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp baking powder
    • 1 tsp baking soda
    • 1 tsp salt

    Instructions

    For the Streusel Topping

    In a small bowl, stir together sugar and butter until smooth.

    Add oats and mix until combined.

    Spread onto a rimmed baking sheet and place in freezer until hardened, about 10 minutes.

    For the Muffins

    Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees.

    In a medium bowl, combine oats and buttermilk and set aside.

    Beat together the oil, eggs and vanilla in a stand mixer with paddle or large bowl with a hand mixer.

    Whisk together the dry ingredients: almond meal, flax meal, sliced almonds, chia seeds, sugar, baking powder and soda.

    Add oat and buttermilk mixture to egg mixture and with the mixer running, slowly add in dry ingredients, 1 cup at a time.

    Spoon the batter into lined muffin tins, filling them about 2/3 of the way and sprinkling with streusel topping.

    Bake the muffins for 12 minutes, than rotate pan. Bake another 12- 14 minutes until golden brown.

    Cool slightly before removing them from pan.

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    curried lentil turkey soup

    This soup was a total accident.

    I didn’t have any leftover turkey – or plans for leftover turkey.

    But then on Saturday, we decided to pick up a 15 pound turkey and have another round of Thanksgiving. My thoughts immediately went to leftovers. Can you blame me?

    Curried lentil soup with turkey came to mind and I had all of the ingredients I needed at home so I turned on the Christmas music, made some tea, pretended it was cold outside and made some soup.

    This soup is flavorful, filling and nice and warm for chilly winter nights. I love it topped with a little greek yogurt and fresh cilantro – it adds such a great fresh and creamy touch!

    *Use shredded chicken and chicken broth if you don’t have leftover turkey.

     

    Curried Lentil Turkey Soup

    by Emily Dingmann

    Prep Time: 15 minutes

    Cook Time: 45 minutes

    Keywords: soup/stew entree gluten-free high fiber high protein fall winter

     

    Ingredients (8 servings)

    For Soup

    • 2 Tbsp oil
    • 1 onion, diced
    • 1 cup diced carrots
    • 1 cup diced celery
    • 1 Tbsp minced ginger
    • 2 Tbsp curry powder
    • 1/2 tsp each: garam masala, tumeric, coriander
    • salt & pepper to taste
    • 2 cups green lentils
    • 8 cups turkey (or chicken) broth (or mix of broth and water)
    • 1-14 oz can coconut milk
    • 3-4 cups shredded turkey (or chicken)

    For Toppings

    • greek yogurt
    • chopped cilantro

    Instructions

    Heat oil in large pot.

    Add onion and occasionally stir for about 3 minutes.

    Add carrots, celery and ginger, cooking for about 5 more minutes.

    Mix in seasonings and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

    Add lentils and broth to pot.

    Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for about 40 minutes.

    Add coconut milk and turkey, bring to a boil and serve.

    Top with greek yogurt and chopped cilantro if desired.

    If soup is not thick enough, let simmer with no cover until desired consistency.

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    What did you make with Thanksgiving leftovers? 

    best {natural} food trends of 2012

     

    The latest natural food trends have always intrigued me, but since working in the natural food business, they are also something that I needed to stay on top of.

    It is one of the reasons why I prefer to go to the store alone – then I can spend all of the time I want wandering up and down every single aisle, every single time I visit the store. (And I could literally go to the store every day).

    These are my favorite natural food trends of 2012 – they aren’t necessarily “new” items, but are really popular this year.

    • Gluten-Free: I’m glad that there are more delicious options for those who must follow a gluten-free diet, but there is also a lot of “junk gluten-free” products out there. (Which means Gluten Free isn’t necessarily healthier)!
    • Probiotics: Are everywhere! In food, drink, water and pouch form. I’m a huge fan of probiotics but I still prefer mine via supplements.
    • Convenience Foods: Foods that require little to no prep time are still a staple in 2012 and come in all forms of breakfast, lunch and dinner.
    • Kombucha: The kombucha section is growing at a steady rate and I’ve tried  a number of them, but my favorites are still GT Kombucha and Kombucha Wonder Drink.
    • Greek Yogurt: Like kombucha, I swear I see a new Greek Yogurt brand/variety every time I visit the store. There is even frozen greek yogurt, but I have yet to try it.
    • Coconut: Found in waters, teas, oils, baked goods and bars, ice creams, milks and sweeteners.

    Which of these food trends do you enjoy? What would you add to the list?