spaghetti & no-cook tomato sauce

Spaghetti & No-Cook Tomato Sauce | anutritionisteats.com

Last weekend was one of the hottest weekends I’ve ever experienced. Seriously. I hate to be dramatic but it was 97 degrees and we don’t have AC.

Well, actually we have one wall unit. It’s in Demi’s room. So once 7pm (aka bedtime) rolls around, no cool air is making its way to the rest of the apartment. Joy.

Spaghetti & No-Cook Tomato Sauce | anutritionisteats.com

So needless to say, spending time in the kitchen was the last thing I wanted to do.

But it’s August and tomatoes and zucchini run rampant. And it was time to start making food for Demi!

Spaghetti & No-Cook Tomato Sauce | anutritionisteats.com

I’ve been waiting very patiently for this day, and I reached the point that I just couldn’t wait any longer! We got the green light to start giving Demi solids at four months but I held out – until now! (She’s almost five months.)

So far, (and we’re one meal in) the plan is to combine some purees with baby led weaning. We’re focusing on savory vegetables because I know she’ll like the sweet ones and some alternative-grain cereals that I found at Whole Foods. I was less-than-impressed with the suggestion to start with rice cereal and decided that for us – vegetables was the way to go.

Spaghetti & No-Cook Tomato Sauce | anutritionisteats.com

So we started with a steamed chard and basil purée with quinoa cereal and some breast milk. It tasted like pesto and Demi eagerly licked the spoon and even gave a smile. Next up is zucchini, basil and avocado!

(I love the book ‘Getting To Yum’ by Karen Le Billion, the author of French Kids Eat Everything. It brings up the concept of Americans (this is a generalization!) assuming that kids won’t like vegetables and French thinking the opposite – that vegetables are prepared deliciously and kids will like them!)

Spaghetti & No-Cook Tomato Sauce | anutritionisteats.com

The ultra-hot cooking session paid off. Demi was happy with her first meal and our fresh tomato sauce was delicious! It’s really easy to make and full of the best produce summer has to offer. Fresh, healthy, tasty.

Spaghetti & No-Cook Tomato Sauce | anutritionisteats.com

Get into the garden, away from the stove and make this perfect end-of-summer sauce!

Spaghetti & No-Cook Tomato Sauce
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 lb cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 small zucchini, grated
  • 2 beefsteak tomatoes, chopped (about 3 cups worth)
  • 1 cup basil
  • ¼ cup pine nuts
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • ¼ tsp red pepper flakes
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 12 oz spaghetti
  • olive oil, parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Place tomatoes and zucchini in bowl, season with salt.
  2. Puree chopped tomatoes, basil, pine nuts, garlic red pepper flakes and salt until smooth.
  3. Pour over tomato and zucchini mixture and stir together. Set aside.
  4. Prepare pasta as directed.
  5. Serve with high-quality olive oil, parmesan cheese and red pepper flakes.
Nutrition Information
Calories: 431 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrates: 75 grams Sugar: 10 grams Fiber: 6 grams Protein: 15 grams Cholesterol: 0 grams

 

 

new product favorites (june)

New Product Favorites | A Nutritionist Eats

oat revolution steel cut maple & brown sugar oatmeal. I have a confession to make. I’m going through a major obsession with maple & brown sugar instant oatmeal. Would I recommend it as a Nutritionist? NO! But it’s kind of addicting and so easy…

greek

sweet earth ‘the greek burrito.’ It’s a blend of white beans, baby spinach, feta and oregano with 13 grams of protein and 5 grams of fiber. It was delicious! (I found it at Target, but have seen it in natural food stores too.)

CLover_CreamOnTop_Plain-e1349343478569

clover ‘cream on top’ whole milk yogurt. I bought this on a whim and I must say that it’s been a while since I’ve boughten non-Greek yogurt. I loved it. The protein isn’t as high (obviously) but it was so lovely…I’ll definitely buy it again.

g & b cold brew coffee. G & B was recently featured in The New York Times as the “best iced latte in America.” It’s made with their homemade almond and macadamia milk. It was delicious, but I love their cold brew coffee even more. I never thought I would say this, but…it doesn’t even need cream.

New Favorite Foods (June) | A Nutritionist Eats

earthbound farm chia & soba noodles & asian greens powermeal bowl. These bowls are a little small for the price, but they would make a great meal (that’s certainly cheaper than a restaurant) when paired with some grilled chicken or tofu. An easy, delicious and organic meal! 

better booch kombucha. I’m still on a fermented foods/kombucha kick (I should really make my own) but I found this LA-made version in Peach Tea flavor (called Morning Glory) and it’s fantastic.

New Product Favorites | A Nutritionist Eats

massel concentrated liquid stock. I love having stock in the pantry, but I have a tiny kitchen and just don’t have the room for boxes upon boxes of stock. I’ve started cooking my quinoa with a mix of water and stock and it is SO much better than all water. Massel recently sent me some of their concentrated stock and I love that it is made with simple ingredients and is vegan and gluten-free.

Have you recently tried a new food that you love and/or I NEED to try? 

roasted asparagus & red pepper quinoa salad

Welcome Self readers, thanks for stopping by! (More About Me | More Salad Recipes)

And if you aren’t coming from Self, be sure to check out the other Epic Picnic Dishes!

Roasted Asparagus & Red Pepper Quinoa Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

I’m the person who always brings a salad to get-togethers. Whether they’re picnics or backyard grilling parties, you can always count on me to bring a salad. Annoying? Maybe, but amidst the dips and desserts, salads always seem like the perfect addition to any table.

Roasted Asparagus & Red Pepper Quinoa Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

A few weeks ago, I made no less than eight batches of quinoa salads. Ok, kind of an exaggeration, but after the second day of bringing bowls of quinoa salad to work, people started asking what was going on.

I asked for feedback between a black bean & quinoa salad and this one and instead of getting any opinions, all I got was requests for the recipes, $5 from someone who had forgotten their lunch that day and a major boost to my quinoa salad ego. Naturally, I’m thinking about setting up a little quinoa salad shop at work.

All this is to say that I’ll probably share the black bean version sometime in the near future!

Roasted Asparagus & Red Pepper Quinoa Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

But we’re talking about the roasted asparagus & red pepper quinoa salad today. I love this salad! It’s vegan (but you don’t have to tell), it’s gluten-free (but no one has to know) and it’s got 12 grams of protein and 10 grams of fiber per serving, thanks to the beans + quinoa! (You can share this fact.)

It’s healthy, but so delicious and flavorful. It’s colorful and light; but the hefty servings are unquestionably satisfying. Serve it on top of some greens if you like or top with some grilled chicken or tempeh for an extra boost of protein.

Roasted Asparagus & Red Pepper Quinoa Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

Lunch. Is. Served.

nutrition facts: 409 calories, 20 grams of fat, 46 grams carbohydrates, 10 grams fiber, 4 grams sugar, 12 grams protein

Roasted Asparagus & Red Pepper Quinoa Salad

by Emily Dingmann

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Keywords: roast entree salad side gluten-free high fiber high protein vegan vegetarian beans quinoa

Ingredients (6 servings)

  • 1 lb asparagus
  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice (about 1 lemon)
  • 1/2 cup olive oil plus 1 Tbsp
  • 1 Tbsp dijon mustard
  • 1 shallot
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 cup chopped roasted red pepper
  • 2-15 oz cans garbanzo beans
  • 1 cup sliced green onion
  • 1 cup chopped parsley

Instructions

Roast asparagus: preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Remove tough bottoms of asparagus and cut into 1 inch pieces. (You should have about 2 cups.)

Drizzle with 1 Tbsp of olive oil and cook for about 10 minutes, until golden brown.

Prepare quinoa: Rinse quinoa in fine mesh strainer.

Add quinoa and 2 cups water to small pan.

Stir, season with salt and bring to a boil.

Lower heat, cover and cook for about 15 minutes.

Prepare vinaigrette: while quinoa is cooking, whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, dijon, mustard, shallot and salt & pepper.

Remove quinoa from heat and let sit for 5 minutes.

Fluff with a fork and toss with vinaigrette.

Drain and rinse garbanzo beans.

When quinoa is cool, toss with remaining ingredients. Chill for at least 3 hours or overnight.

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classic açaí bowl

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

If you have no idea what an açaí bowl is…know that you are not alone.

I probably wouldn’t know either except that I worked in the natural food industry for five years (meaning you see everything out there!)…and now I live in Southern California, where Açaí Bowls are available at every juice bar. And said juice bars are on every corner. If you live in Southern California and you don’t know what an açaí bowl is, then you might be alone. (Not really though because plenty of people in my office didn’t know what it was when I was eating it.)

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

We can start at the beginning.

What is Açaí?

Açaí is a superfood berry from the Amazon and açaí bowls are essentially an açaí smoothie topped with fresh fruit and some granola. Traditionally, the bowls are simple with sliced banana, granola and some guaraná syrup for some sweetness.

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

 

Açaí has very little naturally occurring sugar – each serving of 100 grams of puréed açaí contains 0-2 grams of sugar. For comparison, 100 grams of bananas contain about 12 grams of sugar.

 

 

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

Health Benefits of Açaí:

When açaí came onto the health food scene years ago, it was touted as a superfood. The term superfood doesn’t actually have a legal definition and is used more for marketing, but in my opinion ‘superfood’ means that a food has high levels of vitamins, nutrients, antioxidants, healthy fats, etc. (Old School Superfoods you have at home!)

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

 

Açaí is rich in antioxidants, fiber and healthy fats. Pretty impressive for a little berry, so I definitely consider it a superfood.

 

 

 

Classic Açaí Bowl | A Nutritionist Eats

How to Make an Açaí Bowl:

While the possibilities are endless, I wanted to stick with the classics. (With that said, I can’t wait to try some of the fun additions featured in this great graphic from Sambazon: Anatomy of an Açaí Bowl)

Açaí bowls are really easy to make, they just require a trip to the natural food store to pick up some puréed açaí (found in the freezer) and a blender! The toppings are up to you. Since it is naturally really low in sugars, you might need to add a little honey or agave, or maybe the toppings will add enough. You can always try it without and then drizzle with honey if you need it.

nutrition facts*: 337 calories, 11 grams of fat, 6 grams protein, 57 grams carbohydrates, 9 grams fiber (*calculated using unsweetened almond milk)

Classic Açaí Bowl

by Emily Dingmann

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Keywords: blender breakfast beverage gluten-free high fiber vegan vegetarian spring summer

Ingredients (2 servings)

    Açaí Bowl

    • 7 oz frozen açaí
    • 1 cup milk of choice
    • 1 banana
    • 1 Tbsp honey (optional)

    Toppings

    • sliced banana
    • berries
    • granola

    Instructions

    Blend together açaí, milk, banana and honey.

    Pour into bowls and top with desired toppings.

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