pumpkin hummus with crispy sage

(Thank you all for the sweet, sweet comments on my exciting news! It means so much.)

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage | anutritionisteats.com

How was the weekend? We were both a little under the weather but managed to look at two apartments. Neither are good and I’m not looking forward to the massive search ahead of us, but, I spent a lot of time in the kitchen not thinking about it. (It’s good to ignore your problems, right?) I made a sausage & lentil gumbo (from food52), protein pancake muffins, curried tuna salad and THIS pumpkin hummus with crispy sage.

On Friday afternoon, I set out a can of pumpkin on the counter because something, just SOMETHING needed to be made with pumpkin.

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage | anutritionisteats.com

I know what you’re thinking…just what the world needs, another pumpkin recipe.

But it is the season and I’m 99% certain that it will be the only pumpkin recipe I share this year. So I feel ok about it.

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage | anutritionisteats.com

Speaking of pumpkin, if you are pumpkin-obsessed, be sure to check out these tempting, healthy pumpkin breakfast recipes:

I’m more of a savory person, so I went with the savory (and appetizer!) route with pumpkin hummus with crispy sage. Do you know what crispy sage is?

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage | anutritionisteats.com

Let me tell you. It’s sage that’s cooked in sizzling butter. With garlic. It’s definitely what takes this from being regular hummus….to OMG hummus!

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage | anutritionisteats.com

The pumpkin flavor isn’t too intense in this dip, but it’s there. And it tastes like fall. It would make the perfect appetizer for all of these parties coming up, or you know, just snacking at home as I love to do. :)

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage | anutritionisteats.com

I decided to serve my pumpkin hummus with crostini because I wanted it to feel a little more special than your run-of-the-mill hummus with pita chips but you could use just about anything. And you’ll want to dip just about anything in this hummus, trust!

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage | anutritionisteats.com

 

Pumpkin Hummus with Crispy Sage
Author: Emily Dingmann
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 3 cups (6 servings)
Ingredients
  • 1-15 oz can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup roughly chopped sage
Instructions
  1. Combine beans, pumpkin, olive oil and salt in food processor.
  2. Process until desired consistency. I like to leave mine a little chunky and rustic.
  3. Set aside.
  4. Heat butter in small pan over medium heat.
  5. Add garlic, turn down to medium-low and stir occasionally for 1 minute.
  6. Add sage and cook for another 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  7. Drizzle butter mixture over hummus and sprinkle with sea salt.
  8. Serve with crostini, crackers or bread.
Calories: 184 Fat: 15 grams Carbohydrates: 11 grams Sugar: 1 gram Fiber: 3 grams Protein: 3 grams

PS. I’m taking any and all apartment-hunting advice…

last of summer succotash

Last of Summer Succotash | anutritionisteats.comWe’ve done our fair share of housesitting since we moved to Los Angeles and in addition to enjoying the perks of a real HOUSE, central air, backyards and GRILLS it’s also really fun to hang out in a neighborhood different than ours.

New neighborhoods = new restaurants!

One of our absolute favorite restaurants to visit when we’re housesitting is Beer Belly in Koreatown. (Watch the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives video here.) In addition to their great selection of craft beers (the beer list is always changing) they have some tasty bar food. We’ve tried quite a bit of the menu and love the duck fat fries, the pork belly chips and (and on a healthier note) the summer sucka tash.

Last of Summer Succotash | anutritionisteats.com

Right away, it was one of those dishes that I just knew I’d need to make at home. Because it’s simple enough and SO tasty. And those two words (simple + tasty) are essentially my food motto.

Traditionally, succotash is a combination of lima beans, corn and garlic or onion, but there are a ton of succotash varieties out there. Some are made with tomatoes, some red peppers and some swap edamame for lima beans. I knew right away that I wanted to include edamame in my version to up the protein a bit. I also wanted to include some zucchini because this succotash is all about celebrating end-of-summer produce, not to mention it’s always a good idea to add more vegetables where you can. Beer Belly is definitely the only place I’ve seen succotash topped with chipotle mayo and pickled shallots and I definitely wanted to include them.

Last of Summer Succotash | anutritionisteats.com

And even though corn is in season, and it’s best fresh, I used my favorite roasted corn from Trader Joe’s. Shucking and cutting off corn on the cob isn’t particularly laborious, but remember my motto above… SIMPLE! If you want to use fresh corn – major kudos! If you want to use frozen corn – I get you!

Let’s continue with the simple theme. This dish definitely is. Pickle the shallots. (The night before!) Mix up the chipotle mayo. Sauté the veggies for a few minutes. Done!

Last of Summer Succotash | anutritionisteats.com

Serve it alongside some grilled protein, or with some quinoa for a meatless meal.

Summers over now, right?

Last of Summer Succotash
Author: Emily Dingmann
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 shallots, thinly sliced (about 3/4 cup sliced)
  • 1/4 cup light mayonnaise
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp chipotle, chopped with sauce
  • 1 1/2 cup corn kernels
  • 1 1/2 cup cooked edamame
  • 1 1/2 cup diced zucchini
  • 1 1/2 cup sliced grape tomatoes
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp olive oil
Instructions
  1. Combine apple cider vinegar, sugar and salt in a small jar.
  2. Add sliced shallots to the jar and let sit overnight or for at least a few hours.
  3. Stir together mayonnaise and chipotle peppers and set aside.
  4. Prep remaining ingredients.
  5. Heat oil over medium heat in a large pan.
  6. Add vegetables and cook, stirring occasionally, for about …. minutes.
  7. To serve, top vegetables with a dollop of chipotle mayo and a few of the pickled shallots.
Calories: 143 Fat: 5 Carbohydrates: 15 Sugar: 4 Fiber: 4 Protein: 7
Notes
Pickled shallots should be made a day in advance if possible.

tzatziki

Tzatziki | A Nutritionist Eats

This is my ALL-time favorite dip. ALL. Time. Favorite.

And if you have no idea what tzatziki is, I’ll explain.

Tzatziki | A Nutritionist Eats

Years ago, we visited Greece with my parents and (in addition to having a different color hair) I was introduced to Greek cuisine and I totally fell in love with it. Some of my favorite memories from the trip are the ones that happened around a table. We started our days with these amazing phyllo dough pastries, had the best gyros in a restaurant with dirt floors and no power, some of the freshest seafood I’ve ever had and “extra-amazing” gyros on New Years Day after dancing (if you can call it that) until dawn the night before.

A Nutritionist Eats

It was in Greece that I was introduced to their version of yogurt – which was so thick it reminded us of sour cream. And we were totally smitten with it. It’s also where I was introduced to tzatziki and it’s been a staple in my diet ever since. I can’t even believe I haven’t written about it more, because its something I make on a regular basis and it’s surprisingly easy!

Tzatziki | A Nutritionist Eats

It’s one of those foods that if you’ve ever been intimidated to make it yourself and you buy it from the store – you’ll be blown away by how much better your version is. Seriously, no comparison.

Even better, it doesn’t even require any fancy ingredients. The most exotic ingredient is greek yogurt…and nowadays you can find greek yogurt everywhere. A note about the yogurt: I use reduced-fat or full-fat – never fat-free! The extra flavor and satiety factor are so worth the minimal extra calories in my opinion. Fat-free works fine…if you must!

Tzatziki | A Nutritionist Eats

Tzatziki is so versatile and it’s honestly good on anything. I’ll often make some for the protein portion of my lunch and serve it with toasted pita bread and some fresh veggies. It’s filling and delicious. It’s great on kebabs or with grilled lamb burgers. And most recently, we determined that it’s fantastic on grilled bread. (Everything is good on grilled bread, but tzatziki really is too!)

Tzatziki | A Nutritionist Eats

I’m thinking next week’s lunches might have to feature an epic pita sandwich stuffed with hummus, tzatziki, sliced tomatoes and kalamata olives…who’s with me?!

Tzatziki
Cuisine: Greek
Author: Emily Dingmann
Prep time:
Total time:
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 3/4 medium/large cucumber
  • 16 oz greek yogurt (about 2 cups)
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp dried dill
  • salt & pepper
Instructions
  1. Peel and seed cucumber.
  2. Grate cucumber with a cheese grater and squeeze excess water out with paper towel.
  3. You should have about 1 cup of packed cucumber shreds.
  4. Stir together remaining ingredients, adding salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before serving.
Calories: 163 Fat: 9 Carbohydrates: 9 Sugar: 5 Sodium: 42 Fiber: 1 Protein: 12

 

 

roasted corn, tomato & basil salad

Roasted Corn, Tomato & Basil Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

I need to brag for a minute.

I have successfully grown plants. Yes, plural! I’m not going to publicly call it a garden quite yet, but in my mind it is. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve tried to grow edible plants. Ok, I’ll tell you. Pretty much every year, I’ve tried – and failed – to grow vegetables, herbs, and really anything.

Roasted Corn, Tomato & Basil Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

But that all changed. And this year, I have jalapenos, flowers, succulents, a money tree, cactus and a big OL’ pot of basil. The basil just started multiplying. And then I started to panic…how do I use it fast enough? What can I do besides make pesto (which is a whole conversation in itself)?

So I took the best produce of summer and combined it all together in one, tasty salad.

Can we talk about summer for a minute though? We have done NOTHING. We haven’t gone to the beach, we haven’t been to Malibu, we haven’t even been to the Hollywood Bowl and we haven’t gone to one outdoor movie. We’ve visited our pool once – pathetic. Our favorite outdoor movie location isn’t happening this summer, which is really depressing, we have a few outdoor shows later this summer and we keep talking about the beach, but ugh, we really need to get going.

Roasted Corn, Tomato & Basil Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

Another important topic: not only is this the summer of plants, but it’s the summer of corn. And, I like it. Mexican Street Corn Crostini was a great start to the corn season and I think I’ve got at least one more in me!

But this corn salad could also be considered a salsa, a topping for anything grilled, scrambled eggs or a topping for a green or tomato salad. The possibilities are endless. (And what I really mean is, put this on anything and everything.)

Roasted Corn, Tomato & Basil Salad | A Nutritionist Eats

This recipe comes together really quickly, simply shake together the dressing and toss all ingredients together.

Enjoy! (Are you crossing things off on your summer-do list?)

Roasted Corn, Tomato & Basil Salad
Author: Emily Dingmann
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • 16 oz fire roasted corn, or about 4 cups of grilled corn
  • 16 oz grape tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 2 cups basil
  • 2 Tbsp lime juice
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp mustard
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • salt & pepper
Instructions
  1. Sauté corn lightly if using frozen. Set aside.
  2. Slice tomatoes in half.
  3. Soak onion slices in cold water. (To lessen the intensity.)
  4. Thinly slice the basil into ribbons.
  5. Combine remaining ingredients in small jar. Shake together.
  6. Stir together all ingredients but basil, then gently add basil and stir just until combined.
Calories: 93 Fat: 4 Saturated fat: 0 Carbohydrates: 14 Sugar: 5 Sodium: 11 Fiber: 2 Protein: 2 Cholesterol: 0